Mohin’s story

This troubled boy’s anger towards his violent, abusive father led to a vicious cycle of drug abuse and crime.  Read about Mohin’s journey from darkness to light as he helps the one person he wanted revenge against – his father.

16-year-old Mohin’s spiral into delinquency began with a seemingly simple incident. He offered to sell a mobile phone on behalf of his friend, but instead kept the money from the sale for himself. Consequently, he felt ashamed of his actions and dropped out of school as he was unable to face his friend. His new-found free time resulted in his falling in with a group of unruly, rowdy boys and he began a life of theft, substance abuse and drug abuse. When he was sent by the police to the Observation Home at Dongri, he was referred to an Aangan case worker.  And while we tried talking to him about the consequences of his actions, it would take many more meetings to get through to him. Meanwhile, after six days, Mohin was released on bail from the Home.

 

The turning point in his life was when he returned home drunk one night. Viciously beaten up by his father and later left at the police station, a visibly shaken Mohin called up the Aangan social worker who managed to convince the police to give him another chance. It would be the first time in his life that someone had ever stood up for him. He was taken to the Youth Center where his wounds were dressed and where he was allowed to tell his story. He confessed that he detested his father’s ruthless attitude towards him and his siblings. He wanted revenge for all the times his father had physically abused them. He drank and indulged in reckless behaviour to make his father suffer from shame and humiliation. However, at the same time, he also made the decision to make changes to his life, as he finally understood that “living well is the best revenge”. 

 

For Mohin, peer pressure and drug addiction were the biggest stumbling blocks to his leading a normal, successful life. After a visit to the Kripa de-addiction center at Bandra, he was quite shaken to see the patients there and vowed to kick the habit on his own. Aangan’s social worker counselled him regularly on how to effectively deal with his peers and, after a long journey dotted with setbacks and successes, he was able to assert himself in any situation. Aangan also conducted anger management sessions with his father to ensure that the environment at home improved. 

Mohin has come a long way. He now helps his father, against whom he rebelled, with his cable operator business and his friend with his air-conditioner repair business. Aangan still works with him on his life plan and we are hopeful that his story will inspire many more battling with the demons of risky behaviour.

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